Surprise! People Speak Their Mind More Online

by Pam Dyer

Surprise! People Speak Their Mind More Online

If you spend a lot of time on the Web you already know this, but a new study from eMarketer has found that people behave much differently online than offline.

According to the research, originally conducted by by Euro RSCG Worldwide, “cyberdisinhibition” has caused 43% of U.S.-based Web users to feel less inhibited online. This effect “is most prominent among females and users ages 25 to 54.”

About 20% of adults have used social media to lash out at brands and companies, while 31% feel empowered by the medium to do something they’ve been wanting to do. And social networks are a big help for meeting new people.

Men’s inhibitions seem to be more affected then women’s, as men appear to leverage Web and social-media anonymity more:

emarketer-socialmedia-lashout

eMarketer’s report also underscores an interesting change in the way people prefer to communicate. Almost 49% of respondents said they find electronic communication to be more convenient than the face-to-face variety:

emarketer-online-offline-attitudesI was happy to learn that almost 58% of respondents said they disagree with the statement that “online socializing is for sad, antisocial types.” What a relief!

How has the Internet changed your behavior? Please share your experience in the comments.

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  • http://whatawebsite.org Will McCulloch

    Hi Pam,

    It would also be interesting to see how these statistics compare between different countries/cultures. I imagine the behavioural differences are even higher in the UK – but maybe less in southern Europe and South America.

    Best wishes

    Will
    .-= ´s last blog ..Sites Of The Month – November 2009 =-.

  • http://whatawebsite.org/ Will McCulloch

    Hi Pam,

    It would also be interesting to see how these statistics compare between different countries/cultures. I imagine the behavioural differences are even higher in the UK – but maybe less in southern Europe and South America.

    Best wishes

    Will
    .-= ´s last blog ..Sites Of The Month – November 2009 =-.

  • http://www.unmemorabletitle.co.uk/ Andrew Nattan

    I wonder what their next study will be? Pope’s religion exposed*? Bears toilet habits unearthed**?

    *he’s catholic.
    ** they go in the woods.
    .-= ´s last blog ..The Best (and Worst) Marketing Ploys of the Noughties =-.

  • http://www.unmemorabletitle.co.uk Andrew Nattan

    I wonder what their next study will be? Pope’s religion exposed*? Bears toilet habits unearthed**?

    *he’s catholic.
    ** they go in the woods.
    .-= ´s last blog ..The Best (and Worst) Marketing Ploys of the Noughties =-.

  • Rose

    I found these statistics interesting. Some of the things said online I don’t think a person would dare say to another person’s face.
    .-= ´s last blog ..How do you Twitter- Twitter Tools =-.

  • Rose

    I found these statistics interesting. Some of the things said online I don’t think a person would dare say to another person’s face.
    .-= ´s last blog ..How do you Twitter- Twitter Tools =-.

  • http://www.win-with-1.com/ Alison Moore Smith@Blog in 1 W

    This actually makes me sad. I’ve been online since 1985 — when “online” meant electronic bulletin board systems — and have seen the caustic side of the internet for years.

    I use my real name when I blog and when I comment. That brings with it a certain level of responsibility because I have to be able to stand by what I say. But it certainly is not a level playing field when the majority of posters hide behind screen names, without having to endure the scrutiny of their biases and backgrounds.

    The internet, IMO, is a real ethical challenge.
    .-= ´s last blog ..6 Steps to Startup with WordPress: The Guide for the Wannabe Blogger =-.

    • Pam Dyer

      I know what you mean, Alison. I’ve been online since 1983 (300 baud modem and all-text CompuServe, anyone?), and I use my real name when I post. I don’t like it when people hide behind screen names, either, whether they feel “uninhibited” or not. Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • http://www.win-with-1.com Alison Moore Smith@Blog in 1 Week

    This actually makes me sad. I’ve been online since 1985 — when “online” meant electronic bulletin board systems — and have seen the caustic side of the internet for years.

    I use my real name when I blog and when I comment. That brings with it a certain level of responsibility because I have to be able to stand by what I say. But it certainly is not a level playing field when the majority of posters hide behind screen names, without having to endure the scrutiny of their biases and backgrounds.

    The internet, IMO, is a real ethical challenge.
    .-= ´s last blog ..6 Steps to Startup with WordPress: The Guide for the Wannabe Blogger =-.

    • Pam Dyer

      I know what you mean, Alison. I’ve been online since 1983 (300 baud modem and all-text CompuServe, anyone?), and I use my real name when I post. I don’t like it when people hide behind screen names, either, whether they feel “uninhibited” or not. Thanks for reading and commenting!

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